Enquire Now
Enquire Now
Garden music room

Four Musical Instruments to Learn in Your Garden Music Room

If you’re lucky enough to have a garden music room, you might be tempted to expand your repertoire and take up a new instrument. Whether you had the room built for your current musical escapades or inherited it when you moved into the house, it deserves to be put to good use.

Learning a new instrument is a great way to keep your brain active and explore your talent. The only problem is, some instruments are easier to learn than others. Rather than picking blindly, consider the list of instruments below that can be self-taught with a little perseverance.

Alongside teaching yourself to play an instrument, it is recommended you learn basic music theory. If you don’t already read music (or can read a little bit) having a clear understanding of the notes and directions will give you an advantage when teaching yourself a new skill. Music theory books explain notation and direction in bitesize pieces and there are explainer videos on YouTube too.

Musical Instruments to Learn in Your Garden Music Room

Once you’ve decided you want to learn an instrument, the next step is to choose which one. Luckily, a garden music room is likely to be soundproof, so it doesn’t matter how long it takes you to learn (or how bad you are to begin with).

Bear in mind that all skills take practise, but be aware some require more practise than others. Below are some great instruments to teach yourself. It should make it easier to make your mind up!

1. Learn the piano in your garden music room

The piano is a common choice for self-taught musicians. All the notes are laid out handily in front of you and if you’re lucky enough to have an electric one, it never goes out of tune. Learning the piano is just as much of an exercise for your mind as it is for your digits. The more advanced you get, the quicker you’ll need both to work!

2. The violin is the perfect instrument for a soundproofed room

Nothing sounds sweeter than a beautiful violin solo. Likewise, nothing sounds worse than the screeches and scrapes made by a violin novice. A garden music room is the perfect place to learn an anti-social stringed instrument. Although technically more difficult to learn (the notes aren’t laid out and instead rely on your skill in creating them) the violin is another common choice. Learning from a book isn’t always enough when it comes to getting tuning and some video education is recommended.

Garden music room

3. Your voice is an instrument too!

Musical sorts generally have a good ear for notes and the ability to carry a tune. The voice is an instrument and benefits from learning the right techniques. The ability to sing in tune isn’t enough and it’s not worth damaging your vocal chords by skipping the basics. This is definitely something that can be learned from videos, so check out free YouTube videos to help with your technique.

4. The clarinet is a great orchestral option

Learning an instrument can be a social event too. Teaming up with friends to form a band, or joining a local orchestra can help keep your hobby alive. The clarinet is a popular orchestral instrument, meaning if you want to join clubs down the line, you’re likely to find a place. The added bonus is that it folds away and is far lighter to lug around than a double bass.